Johnville No153 03nov1866

MF – 1866.11.03 – Johnville – Author, J. F. Maguire M.P. – #153 – F12251
 
J. F. Maguire, Esq., M. P., left St. John for Canada via Portland, Me., in the “New Brunswick” on Thursday. During his brief stay in this Province he laboured indefatigably to gather material for a work on the Irish in America, the copy right of which he has already composed of to the great London publishers, the Longmans. He relies as far as possible on personal observation, and on the morning after his first arrival in St. John he started in company with the Right Rev. Dr. Sweeny to pay a visit to the new settlement of Johnville, a journey to and fro of nearly four hundred miles. The water in the river was so much lower than is usual at this season, that even the little steamer Gazelle had discontinued running to Woodstock, and the journey from Fredericton up and back, a distance of over two hundred miles, was performed by stage. At Johnville Mr. Maguire made the most minute examination of the farms, houses, barns, crops, stock, &c., of the settlers whom he visited in their homes, and on his return he was enthusiastic in his description of what he saw. The evidence of the courage, enterprise, industry and perseverance of these settlers who, by their own exertions, have attained comfort and independence in a few years, met him on every side, and not only afforded him the greatest satisfaction, but excited his admiration. The settlers themselves, with a laudable pride, described their struggles, and trials, and contrasted their present happy condition with what they had known in Ireland. This journey occupied five of the eight days Mr. Maguire spent in New Brunswick, but it enabled him to see a large portion of the Province. The Irish population everywhere welcomed him with delight, and manifested their admiration of his character and their gratitude for his services to their unfortunate country. The Irishmen of St. John desired to show their respect and regard for him by giving him a public dinner, but unfortunately he had made arrangements which prevented his remaining more than a day or two in this city.

We are satisfied that Mr. Maguire’s book will remove many of the erroneous ideas respecting the character and the position of the Irish in America which now prevail in Great Britain and even in Ireland itself, and will do all the good the talented and patriotic author seeks to accomplish.