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Irish-New Brunswick Facts & Trivia

Saint John

Bishop William Dollard

Bishop Thomas Connolly

Bishop Thomas Connolly

The first three Bishops of the Diocese of Saint John were natives of Ireland – William Dollard (far left) of Mooncoin, County Kilkenny, Thomas L. Connolly of Cork (left centre) and John Sweeny (right), of Clones. All were visionaries and builders.
Bishop John Sweeny

Bishop John Sweeny

Timothy Warren Anglin

Timothy Warren Anglin

1849 Timothy Warren Anglin (left) – Born in Clonakilty, County Cork, immigrated to NB in 1849. He founded “The Freeman” newspaper, perpetuated today as “The New Freeman” a Catholic Diocesan Weekly. He later served as a member of the Provincial Legislature and of the House of Commons, where he became the first and only speaker from NB. His daughter Margaret became a noted stage actor in the United States at the turn of the century and his eldest son, E.A. Anglin, became a distinguished member of the Supreme Court of Canada.

Shirley Dysart (right), the first elected woman MLA from Saint John, went on to become the first woman interim leader of the Liberal Party, the First woman Minister of education and the first woman Speaker of the House.

Robert J. Higgins, Leader of the New Brunswick Liberal Party, was the first Irish Catholic from Saint John to be elected to lead a provincial political party.

1993 Thomas J. Higgins, was the first elected Irish Catholic Mayor of Saint John, 1993 – 1995.

Shirley Dysart

Shirley Dysart

Sister Honoria Conway

Sister Honoria Conway

Sister Honoria Conway (left), a young Galway-born novice serving in New York, was among the first to respond to Bishop Connolly’s calls for assistance, and it was under her leadership, in 1854, the widely-respected teaching and nursing order, the Sisters of Charity was formed in Saint John.

Dr. James Patrick Collins(right) a native of Cork, volunteered to help treat fever victims on Partridge Island shortly after setting up his medical practice at York Point. Three weeks after arriving on the island to assist Doctors George J. and William S. Harding, he contracted typhus and succumbed “a martyr to his duty”, on 2 July 1847 at the age of 23 years.

Dr. James Patrick Collins

Dr. James Patrick Collins

1836:  Michael Flood emigrated from County Kildare in 1836. In 1848 he started what has become Canada’s oldest construction company, now John Flood & Sons (1961) Ltd.

Samuel Perry McCavour, of Irish ancestry, who settled in Lorneville, was comptroller of currency from 1925-1930, and as such, his signature appears on Canadian banknotes of that period.

E.J. Henneberry, who later became one of the city’s best-known Provincial Court Magistrates, was elected to the Legislature in 1935 and became president of the Executive Council.

Ralph McInerney was elected to the Legislature in 1939 and George McInerney, along with long time school principal Arthur W. Carton, followed in the 1950s. All were from Saint John.

Michael Flood

Michael Flood

1967 Fort Howe Replica

1967 Fort Howe Replica


1780 – Fort Howe:Saint John had a blockhouse and garrison commanded during the American Revolution by Capt. Gilford Studholme, a native of Ireland. A full-size replica of Fort Howe was constructed in Saint John in 1967.

1819 – Saint Patrick’s Society: The Saint Patrick’s Society in St. John was founded in 1819 for “Gentlemen of Irish descent”. In its early years it provided financial and other assistance for new immigrants from Ireland. The original Society dissolved in the 1880s but was revived in 1929. The Presidency alternates between a Protestant and a Catholic each year.

1843 – Saint John’s first “Irish Free Presbyterian Church” was founded in 1843 when the St. John Congregation, wanting a minister from Ireland, separated from the Scottish-based St. Andrew’s Congregation. Their first minister, Rev. Robert Irvine, came from Ballynahinche in 1844.

1847 – Partridge Island: This historic gateway to Saint John can be viewed in the distance from almost any part of the waterfront. Guardian of Saint John Harbour, Partridge Island was named by the French explorer Samuel de Champlain, and has a long immigration, quarantine and military history. The 10 hectare (24-acre) island was designated as a quarantine station in 1785, making it the first such station in North America. Floods of Irish and other immigrants passed through this “Ellis Island of Canada,” and it also served as a military base. The quarantine station was inundated with “Famine Irish”, reaching the peak in 1847. It closed in 1941 and military operations ceased in 1947. The island has been declared both a National and Provincial Historic Site.

1997 – Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann: The Saint John branch of this International organization is formed. It is devoted to the preservation and promotion of traditional Irish dance and music. With an active membership, it holds regular musical Sessions as well as participating in workshops with international performers and instructors.

Irish-New Brunswick Facts & Trivia

Northumberland County

Chatham

1846: Patrick Carroll, & James and Patrick Desmond were master ship-builders for many of the ships built in the shipyards.The first Irish Born to receive political prominence on the Miramichi was Martin Cranny of Chatham, who in 1846, was elected to the House of Assembly.

Others who followed included Thomas Gillespie, a native of Mallow, County Cork, who was President of the Executive Council in the Conservative administration of Andrew Blair (late 1800s).


Thomas Barry (right), was born in Pokemouche, Gloucester County, in 1841. He was the second Bishop of Chatham, appointed in 1902.

Bishop Thomas Barry

Bishop Thomas Barry

St. Michael's Basilica

St. Michael’s Basilica


Rev. John Sweeny, in 1847, Pastor of St. Michael’s Parish in Chatham, built a small rectory and its future functions read like the official history of the town: Episcopal residence, first Hotel Dieu Hospital, the starting point of St. Thomas College, St. Joseph’s Preparatory School for boys and the convent of the Religious Hospitalliers of St. Joseph.

Born in Chatham of Irish parentage, Patrick James Riordon became an early Bishop of San Francisco and his cousin, also Chatham born, D. Dunne became the Bishop of Chicago.

Newcastle

Patrick Hennessey, who came with the Famine Irish in 1853, established a grocery business which grew into a large wholesale & retail trade.

John Daniel Creaghan, from County Cork, who arrived in 1875, founded the company that bore his name.

John Morrissey, also a native of Ireland, was a merchant and political figure who was elected to the Legislative Assembly in 1903 and 1908 and served as Minister of Public Works. At one time he was also President of the Board of Trade.

Community Histories
O


O’Neils: 9 mi. NW of Moncton. PO O’Neil c1889 – 1933, D. O’Neil, first postmaster.

Community Histories
E

Ellis Brook: Flows NW into Chaleur Bay, at Janeville. Named for Francis Ellis from Bandon, Ireland, c1818

Emigrant Settlement: Former community, 3 mi. W of Central Hampstead: Hampstead Parish, Queens County: settled 1835 by Irish immigrants: also known as Hibernia Settlement.

Ennishone: Settlement, 3 mi. N of Drummond and 3 mi. NE of Grand Falls: Drummond Parish, Victoria County: probably named for Innishowen, County Donegal in Ireland: settled in 1861: PO 1887-1936: in 1866 Ennishone was a community with about 24 families: in 1898 Ennishone was a settlement with 1 post office and a population of 100: included community of Godbout: today Ennishone is a dispersed community.

Ennishore: Violette Station: Settlement and station, 1 mi. NE of Drummond, on Canadian National Railway line to Davis Mill: Drummond Parish, Victoria County: Emilie Violette was a settler: the station was also called Ennishore and Drummond Station: Violette Station became part of Drummond.

Enniskillen: Settlement, 2 mi. NE of Patterson, on road to Petersville: Petersville Parish, Queens County: settled about 1826 by Irish: first known as Adair Settlement: renamed for town SW of Omagh in Ireland: in 1871 Enniskillen had a population of 150 and was a station on the European and North American Railway: PO Enniskillen Station 1870-1882 and from 1883: in 1898 Enniskillen Station was a flag station on Canadian Pacific Railway and a community with 1 post office, 1 store, 1 hotel and a population of 75: included Blakely, 1 mi. E of Enniskillen: PO Blakely 1888-1911 with John Blakely as postmaster: in 1898 Blakely was a farming community with 1 post office, 1 store and a population of 75: today Enniskillen is a dispersed community.

Community Histories
A

Acton: Settlement, 3 mi. E of Harvey, on road to Cork: Manners Sutton Parish, York County: settled by Irish in 1842: possibly named for John Emerich Edward Dalberg, 1st Baron Acton (1834-1902), proponent of Irish home rule: PO 1865-1870: in 1866 Acton was a farming settlement with about 70 resident families: in 1871 it had a population of 175: Acton became part of Cork.

Adair Settlement: See Enniskillen (Petersville Parish, Queens County

Allison Settlement: 1810, On Northwest Miramichi River, 19 miles NW of Newcastle. Named for William Allison from Northern Ireland, 1810.

Community Histories
R

Riceville: Settlement, 3 mi. W of Verret: Saint-Hilaire Parish and Baker Brook Parish, Madawaska County: established 1872: possibly named for Francis Rice, Madawaska MLA 1850-1855: it included community of Colin: PO Colin 1909-1951 with Edward Colin as first postmaster: also included settlement of Ouellette: today Riceville is a dispersed community. (Francis Rice – Date of Entry – 1823)

Riley Brook: Flows W into Tobique River. Said to be named for a man drowned there. On Saunders 1842, thus not for for a draft eveader as noted by Bailey 1894.

Riordon: Settlement on Chaleur Bay, 1 mi. NE of Pokeshaw, on road to Grande-Anse: New Bandon Parish, Gloucester County: PO 1890-1913 with John J. Riordon as postmaster: in 1898 Riordon was a farming and lumbering community with 1 store, 1 hotel, 1 saw and grist mill and a population of 50: became part of Pokeshaw.

Roach: Settlement, 3 mi. S of Cork, on Canadian Pacific Railway line from Cork Station to Harvey: Manners Sutton Parish, York County: was settled about 1850: it was named for Michael Roach, settler: abandoned by 1903: today Roach is a locality.

Rooskey Lake: Hurd Lake – W of Loch Alva. Named for Samuel Proudfoot Hurd, a land grantee there. Mahood 1837 Rooskey lake, named for a lake in Co. Cavan, Ireland.

Community Histories
W

Walker Settlement: Community, 5 mi. E of Jeffries Corner and 4 mi. SE of Rockville: Waterford Parish, Kings County: named for Samuel Walker, a settler from Ireland about 1830: PO Walker’s Settlement 1884-1917: in 1898 it was a farming settlement with 1 post office and a population of 50: also included the settlement of Arnoldville: PO Arnoldville 1913-1917: today Walker Settlement is a dispersed community.

Waterford: Settlement adjacent Poley Mountain, 3 mi. S of Urney, on the road from Rockville to Cedar Camp: Waterford Parish, Kings County: first called Seely’s Mills: PO 1852-1875: in 1871 “Seeley’s Mills” and surrounding district had a population of 650: in 1898 Seely’s Mills was farming settlement with a population of about 450: it was renamed in 1875: PO Waterford 1875-1963: in 1904 it had 1 post office, 2 stores, 1 cheese and butter factory, 1 carriage factory, 2 sawmills, 2 grist mills, 3 churches and a population of 600: today Waterford is a dispersed community.

Waterford Parish: Kings County: created from Sussex Parish in 1874: Said to be named by Andrew McAfee because Dutch Valley reminded him of County Waterford, Ireland.

Waterloo Corner: Settlement, 3 mi. S of Salmon Creek, on the road to Joliffs Brook: Johnston Parish, Queens County: settled in 1819 by Irish immigrants who had fought with Wellington at Battle of Waterloo, 18 June 1815: became part of Irish Settlement and today it is a locality.

Watson Settlement: Community, 4 mi. W of Belleville: Richmond Parish, Carleton County: John Watson was a settler from Northern Ireland about 1828: PO 1859-1916 with John Watson as the first postmaster: in 1866 Watson Settlement was a farming community with approximately 45 resident families including Adam, James, John and William Watson: in 1871 it had a population of 200: in 1898 Watson Settlement had 1 post office and a population of 100: today it is a dispersed community.

Wicklow: Settlement on W side Saint John River, 4 mi. N of Florenceville, on the road to Upper Wicklow: Wicklow Parish, Carleton County: named for town on the E coast of Ireland: it included community of Chester: PO Wicklow 1848-1912: in 1866 Wicklow was a farming settlement with 37 families: in 1871 it had a population of 300: in 1898 Wicklow had 1 church and a population of 50: today is a dispersed community.

Wicklow Parish: Carleton County: it was set off in 1833 from Kent Parish and named for County Wicklow in Ireland.

Woodpecker Hall: Settlement on McManus Lake, 2 mi. E of Hampton: Hampton Parish, Kings County: was named by settlers fo

Community Histories
V

Vinegar Hill: Settlement, 3 mi. NE of Southfield, on road to Upper Wards Creek: Sussex Parish, Kings County: was possibly named for the rebel’s challenge at Vinegar Hill, near Wexford, Ireland, 1798: settled by Irish: included settlement of Poodiac: today Vinegar Hill is a dispersed community.

Community Histories
V

Vinegar Hill: Settlement, 3 mi. NE of Southfield, on road to Upper Wards Creek: Sussex Parish, Kings County: was possibly named for the rebel’s challenge at Vinegar Hill, near Wexford, Ireland, 1798: settled by Irish: included settlement of Poodiac: today Vinegar Hill is a dispersed community.

Community Histories
Y

Youghhall: Settlement on Nepisiguit Bay, 3 mi. N of Bathurst: Bathurst Parish, Gloucester County: named for Youghal, County Cork, Ireland by settlers about 1830: in 1866 Youghall was a fishing and farming community with approximately 15 resident families: in 1871 it had a population of 100: PO 1887-1955: in 1898 Youghall had 1 post office and a population of 150: now within city of Bathurst.

Community Histories
P

Partridge Island:  In Saint John Harbour. Quarantine Station forever associated with the Great Irish Famine of 1845 – 1852, Derived from French perdrix for "partridge".

Patterson or Patterson Settlement: Community, 3 mi. S of Hoyt and 3 mi. NW of Wirral: Blissville Parish, Sunbury County and Petersville Parish, Queens County: Walter, William and Andrew Patterson, from County Donegal, Ireland, settled about 1840: PO 1866-1915: in 1898 Patterson Settlement had 1 post office, 1 church and a population of 75: became part of Hoyt.

Phillipstown: Settlement, 3 mi. NE of Coles Island, on the road to Brookvale: Johnston Parish, Queens County: was named for David Phillips, settler and teacher from Derry, Ireland, 1819: Thomas, William Sr. and William Phillips Jr. were also settlers: included Victory: PO 1879-1929: in 1898 Victory was a settlement with 1 post office and a pop- ulation of 50: today Phillipstown is a dispersed community.

Pokeshaw: Settlement on Chaleur Bay, 3 mi. SW of Grande-Anse, on the road to New Bandon: New Bandon Parish, Gloucester County: PO Pockshaw 1860-1913: in 1866 it was a fishing, farming and lumbering community with about 57 resident families: in 1871 Pokeshaw and surrounding district had a population of 600: in 1898 Pokeshaw was a flag station on Caraquet and Gulf Shore Railway and had 1 post office, 2 stores, 1 hotel, 1 sawmill, 1 grist mill and a population of 250: it included Riordon: PO 1890-1913 with John J. Riordon as the first postmaster: in 1898 Riordon was a farming and lumbering settlement with 1 post office, 1 store, 1 hotel, 1 saw and grist mill and a pop -ulation of 50: today Riordon and Pokeshaw are dispersed communities.